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Balazs Pinter

 
2.0326
Chemistry and Computer Science Building
El Paso Texas, 79968
Homebpinter@utep.edu
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Balazs Pinter
Assistant Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Dr. Pinter’s research is centered around the fundamental questions of light harvesting, energy conversion, small molecule activation, energy storage and molecular-level engineering of molecular properties, including redox and photophysical behaviors. He uses accurate computational protocols, dominantly solution-state density functional theory, to reveal and tackle challenges in the molecular level design of transition metal complexes and small organics with relevance to the contemporary chemical and societal problems. Through large-scale systematic investigations and carefully designed in silico experiments my group aims to analyze and quantify the electronic, structural, steric, ‘cooperative’, etc. mechanisms that determine the sought function of molecular platforms to obtain an electronic structure (wavefunction)-based understanding and to derive design principles for various target properties. The rational engineering of redox active ligands in transition metal complexes and the photochemistry of TM complexes and polar organic species plays a key role in my projects. Using our large-scale systematic computational approach and rational design strategies we investigate (i) redox flow battery electrolytes, (ii) metal-ligand cooperative multi-electron catalysts (iii) newer generation photoredox catalysts and (iv) the dual fluorescence or organic species that could serve as probe molecules for the detection of various diseases. We are also developing a calculation manager platform to facilitate learning through undergraduate research.

KEYWORDS

  1. Molecular physical chemistry
  2. Quantum and computational chemistry
  3. Photoredox catalysis
  4. Density functional theory
  5. Homogenous catalysis
  6. Redox active ligands
  7. Photochemistry of TM complexes